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ENGLISH AND OLD FRENCH

English and French have a lot in common. Their linguistic similarities can be explained by history - the two languages have been in contact for quite a long time and have been influencing each other a lot. One of the most important dates in that respect is probably 1066, which can be seen as a turning point. More than a simple military invasion, 1066 can also be described as a linguistic one since the Norman conquerors brought in a lot of words that are still present in English today and have a very close French equivalent. A typical example is the similarity between the English 'forest' and the French 'forêt'. The presence of a circumflex accent (or sometimes of an 'é') in a French word usually indicates that there used to be an 's' in Old French. Obviously, the 's' has remained in English. Here are other examples - can you work out what they are?



Many more English and French words share a common origin and that can be seen through other recurring patterns. Please consider each of the following group of words and try to guess the English equivalent (and the pattern behind it).


Guerre, garde-robe, gaufre

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Château, fourche, échapper

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Chameau, vaisseau, veau

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Rond, profond, montagne

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Matière, manière, papier

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Père, poisson, peu

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